Everything You Need to Know About Rubies: History, Facts, and More

 

Everything You Need to Know About Rubies: History, Facts, and More

Rubies are some of the most precious and expensive gemstones in the world. They have been treasured since ancient times, and their rich red color has come to symbolize love, passion, and power. But what exactly is a ruby? And what makes it so special? Here's everything you need to know about rubies: their history, facts, and more.

So what exactly is a ruby? And what makes it so special?

Rubies are a precious gemstone that has been revered for centuries. The name ruby comes from the Latin word "ruber," meaning red. The precise definition of a ruby is a chromium-containing aluminum oxide. What makes rubies so special is their hardness. Rubies rank 9 on the Mohs scale of hardness, making them one of the hardest substances on Earth, second only to Diamonds. This hardness gives rubies exceptional durability, which is why they are often used in fine jewellery and watches.

Rubies are among the most precious and expensive gemstones in the world

Rubies are one of the four precious stones, along with diamonds, sapphires, and emeralds. Rubies can range in color from pale pink to blood red, and they are often assumed to be red because that is their most common color. The cost of rubies varies depending on their carat weight, color saturation, and clarity While all rubies are valuable, the finest quality examples command very high prices indeed.

History and Lore

Ruby is a powerful gemstone that has been used throughout history for its protective qualities. Wearing a ruby was believed to help keep soldiers safe in battle, and in modern times, the ruby slippers worn by Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz are thought to protect her from harm. There are also references to rubies in the Bible, where they are associated with beauty and wisdom.

 

In India, rubies were traditionally thought to bring peace to those who wear them. And in Thailand, which is one of the leading countries for ruby mining and production, the stone is still revered for its power and beauty.

 

They have been treasured since ancient times

Rubies have been treasured since ancient times for their incredible hardness, as well as their rich red color. Often referred to as the "king of gems," rubies are considered one of the most valuable gemstones in the world. In fact, some historians believe that rubies were once worth more than diamonds! Rubies have been used in jewellery and other decorative objects for centuries, and continue to be one of the most popular gemstones today.

 

Their distinctive rich red color has come to symbolize love, passion, and power

Rubies have been prized for centuries for their distinctive rich red color, which has come to symbolize love, passion, and power. The finest rubies are said to be "pigeon's blood" red, and these rare gems can command prices in excess of $1 million per carat. Rubies are found in a wide variety of colors, from the palest pink to deep crimson. Most commercial rubies are treated with heat or chemicals to improve their color and clarity. Despite their popularity, rubies remain one of the world's most mysterious gemstones.

 

Famous Rubies

 

Rubies have been treasured for centuries and are some of the most valuable gemstones in the world. Until the early 19th century, many people believed that all red stones were rubies. However, it was later discovered that some "rubies" were actually red spinels. In fact, many famous rubies, such as the "Black Prince's Ruby" and the "Timur Ruby," are actually red spinel

 

Today, fine quality rubies are still highly sought-after and can fetch a high price at auction. For example, in 2011 an 8.24-carat ruby ring belonging to Elizabeth Taylor sold for $4.2 million dollars, with the price per carat amounting to approximately $500,000. The most expensive ruby ever sold was the "Hope Ruby" which weighs 32.08 carats and sold for $6.74 million dollars.

 

 

 

Synthetic Rubies and Ruby Treatments

 

Though all rubies have some type of imperfection, this is actually what helps to distinguish them from synthetic rubies. Synthetic rubies will often lack inclusions, making them relatively easy to identify.

 

Simulated rubies have been used in jewelry production since the 1850s as a cheaper alternative to natural rubies. These simulated gems are also known as garnet doublets and are created by fusing a piece of garnet with a pinkish-red piece of glass.

 

 

Synthetic Rubies, which were introduced into the commercial market in the late 1800s are created in laboratories through the process of flame-fusion. This method was perfected by chemist Auguste Verneuil, and gained widespread recognition after being showcased at the Paris World's Fair in 1900.

 

Theodore H. Maiman created the world's first functional laser using a synthetic ruby crystal in 1960. This breakthrough not only paved the way for modern laser technology but also laid the foundation for the development of microelectronics

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